World Architecture Festival 2013 – a report

By Team IAnD Photography: Courtesy WAF’13

October 2 -4 2013 saw three busy days of ideation, discussion and critiques on global architecture and design at the World Architecture Festival held at Moshe Safdie designed Marina Bay Sands, Singapore – a venue as awe inspiring as the projects that unfolded within its festive panorama-

The World Architecture Festival opened to enormous numbers (reportedly the biggest yet) with the theme of 2013 bring -Value and values’, -to examine the relationship between perceptions of financial value and the values that architects typically hold about their work.-

Director of WAF’13, Paul Finch commenting on the sheer quality and diversity of the projects entered into the festival, and shortlisted for the final round of awards, said that the array of projects demonstrated the increasingly global nature of the event.

Among various stalwarts from various quarters of the world, Mumbai’s Ar. Sanjay Puri’s corporate project in Jaipur -72 Screens’, was also shortlisted for the awards.

A vibrant, thought-provoking three-day session of presentations of various projects by the architects, seminars and talks on diverse issues that touch and plague the building industry were discussed and debated. Noted international speakers, project critiques and appreciations apart, everyone waited with baited breath as the ultimate honour – the winner of the World Building of the Year 2013 award was announced and granted to the Aukland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki in New Zealand by Frances-Jones Morehen Thorp and Archimedia.

The four main award winners including World Building of the Year Award were Botanical Garden Australia designed by landscape studio Taylor Cullity Lethlean and plant expert Paul Thompson for Landscape of the Year; National Maritime Museum of China designed by Cox Rayner Architects for Future Project of the Year; and Barcelona Apartment by David Kohn Architects for World Interior of the Year.

As part of INSIDE: World Festival of Interiors, an event held in conjunction with the WAF’13 with a concentration on interior projects, shortlisted 59 outstanding interior projects across the 12 award categories, Bars and Restaurants, Creative Re-use, Culture, Display, Education, Health, Hotels, Offices, Residential, Shopping Centres, Shops, and Transport. For the complete list of awardees, do check out:

to view images click on globalhop.indiaartndesign.com

Drafting And Architecture Training

Are you seeking drafting and architecture training? If so, you must understand that in order to become a legal, practicing architect in the United States, you are required to follow a specific educational path, and be licensed.

To attain a professional license, future architects must first attain professional drafting and architecture training from a qualified school. Upon successful graduation, candidates are required to participate in an internship to continue their drafting and architecture training. After that, the student may go on to taking the Architect Registration Examination (ARE) and must receive passing scores on all divisions.

If you are wondering what drafting and architecture training really consists of, the coursework will generally include related subjects such as architectural history, theory, building design, construction techniques, liberal arts, math, physical sciences, professional practice, arts and design, and computer aided drafting (CAD).

If you are serious about a career in drafting and architecture, then a vocational school or community college is a good place to gain your footing. Most employers are seeking experienced and well-educated candidates, so it is important to obtain a solid background in academics and technologies suited for the dual career. Drafting and architecture training that can be transferred to a 4-year college can be used as a stepping stone to a Bachelor Degree in Architecture and Drafting. Some vocational schools offer comprehensive technical training that will lead to a certificate or diploma of completion; others may offer an Associate Degree.

Aspiring professionals who have completed their vocational drafting and architecture training, and have successfully met all requirements of licensure, may earn anywhere from $25,000 to nearly $100,000 per year, depending on combined education and experience.

If you would like to learn more about Drafting and Architecture Training and Drafting and Architecture Schools, or even Online Drafting and Architecture Schools, you can find more in-depth information and resources on our website.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERAL OVERVIEW and may or may not reflect specific practices, courses and/or services associated with ANY ONE particular school(s) that is or is not advertised on our website.

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Victorian Architecture – Where Culture Meet Elegance

The term Victorian architecture refers to a number of styles of architecture, which was primarily used during the Victorian period. These architectural styles were quite popular during the period of mid 1837 to the beginning of 1901. This period marked the rule of Queen Victoria and was named after her.

The Victorian era of architecture, was marked by a number of styles, such as Renaissance Revival, Neo-Grec, British Arts and Crafts movement, Italianate, Gothic Revival, Jacobethan, Neoclassicism, Industrial architecture, Painted ladies, Queen Anne, Stick-Eastlake, Romanesque Revival, as well as Second Empire.

There have also been Folk as well as Shingle Style Victorian Houses. As it is, the names of the architectural styles, apart from their adaptations had varied between the countries. Several homes merged the elements of various styles and therefore are not easily discernible as one particular style. In the United States, highly decorated houses have often been addressed to as gingerbread houses.

Some of the most prominent Victorian era cities include Richmond, London, Toronto, Boston, St. Louis, Louisville, Saint Paul, Galena, Nelson, Sydney, Melbourne, IL, Galveston, Chicago, Detroit, San Francisco, Glasgow, Kolkata, Mumbai, Pittsburgh, Manchester, Philadelphia, Grand Rapids, as well as New Orleans.

In the United States, the South End of the city of Boston has been recognized as the oldest, as well as the largest Victorian neighborhood of the country. Old Louisville in Kentucky is also believed to be one of the largest Victorian neighborhood of America.

Apart from that, Richmond, Virginia is also home to a number of large Victorian neighborhoods, with the Fan and Church Hill, being the most prominent. Church Hill enjoys the distinction of being a place where Patrick Henry had given his famous speech at the historic Saint John’s church.

The Distillery District of Toronto is home to the largest as well as the best preserved collection of industrial architecture of the Victorian-era in North America. Apart from that, Cabbage town has been the largest as well as the most continuous Victorian style residential area of North America. The other Victorian neighborhoods of Toronto include Annex, Corktown, Park dale, as well as Rosedale.

The Old West End neighborhood in Toledo, Ohio has been recognized as the one having the biggest collection of the late Victorian as well as Edwardian architectural homes of the United States. Carroll Avenue of Los Angeles contains the city’s highest concentration of homes of Victorian style.

There is something really fascinating about the Victorian era and almost everything related to this period, continues to fascinate us to this date, especially Victorian architecture.

Time for a greener architecture

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The Gestalt school identified several principles of use to artists and architects, but the most important is that of balance – that is, the constantly shifting balance that balances all opposites within the constantly shifting matrix of reality. Interestingly the principles of form found in the natural world are not dissimilar to the Gestalt principles that also operate in the unselfconscious human building traditions I referred to at the beginning of this article. Vernacular building traditions have evolved slowly over long periods of time and thus possess some of the coherent organic order found also in Nature. As in animal architecture, vernacular architecture possesses an inherent beauty: the beauty of integrity and unity. Such beauty emerges from the totally balanced integration of a system, its function and use into the broader realms of Nature.

So have we stumbled onto the reason why so many modern human-made environments fail to come up to the quality of some older towns and cities? At root the problem seems to lie in the spiritual posture that we adopt with Nature. Many people would now accept that as humans we are completely co-terminal with Nature. However, in claiming ownership, as we do, of that part of Nature that we call -self’, we not only separate ourselves from Nature but also separate ourselves from our own environments. Yogis tell us that the transcendental world of the spirit – the world of unity and pure consciousness – supports the relative world at each point. They tell us that the transcendental realm is a world without qualities yet gives rise to and sustains all qualities. They tell us that it is to be found in the -gap’ between the different states of consciousness: waking, dreaming and sleep; in the silences in music; between syllables in spoken language and even between our thoughts. The great 19th-century Indian holy man Ramakrishna Paramahansa was once asked, -Where do I find God?- His reply was, -Look between two thoughts.- This gap between perfectly balanced opposites is where life and spirit enter the relative world. It is also the vital middle ground between a subject and an object that defines the -mean’ and gives the meaning.

In conclusion we can say that it is order that gives life to a work and it is order that gives a work its spiritual dimension. It is in the perfect orderliness of a great work that the two worlds of materiality and spirit conjoin. Order is the agent that serves as the conduit between these two realms. Dare we say that -orderliness’ is next to -Godliness’?

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Spanish Mission Art Deco Style Architecture

In the architectural world, just as in the worlds of food, clothing, and design, as styles come together we have whats called fusion. In fusion, often disparate elements come together to create a cohesive union, and sometimes seemingly harmonious elements come together in a not so harmonious way. In terms of architecture, a truly interesting blend happened in the beginning of the 20th century, melding together the elements of Spanish Mission revival style with the hip sleekness of Art Deco.

Art Deco buildings are known for their futuristic, sleek, dramatic, geometric flair. Cubes, zigzags, and futuristic chic came together to express the growing machine age in the United States. In the roaring twenties and early thirties, the jazzy Art Deco architecture was sweeping the nation. The Art Deco style found its inspiration from many different sources. The austere shapes and curves were taken from the Bauhaus School and the streamlined modern technology-looking design was melded with images of icons from the Far East, Greece, Rome, Africa, India, and Mayan and Aztec cultures. But above all these, Art Deco took inspiration from an architectural discovery in Egypt.

In 1922, archaeologist Howard Carter and his sponsor, Lord Carnarvon, thrilled the world with their discovery of the tomb of King Tutankhamen. Egypt-chic soon swept the nation and influenced the design of clothes, jewelry, furniture and graphic design. And of course, architecture.

Another style that was popping-up at the same time was the Spanish Mission Revival style, and in California, these two disparate styles found a way to come together in harmony as Hollywood actors were clamoring to get their homes built in the chic Spanish style. California isnt the only place to see the beautiful union of these two styles.
Hawkes Bay has some tremendous Art Deco and Spanish Mission Walks. Hawkes Bay is located in Napier, New Zealand. Following a devastating earthquake in 1931, the whole commercial heart of Napier was destroyed, but the city was about to be reborn in the newest architectural style, and to become the hottest city. In Hawkes Bay, you get to see all the styles right next to each other: Spanish Classic, Spanish mission, and Art Deco, all side by side.

There are also places in the United States that show this great mixture of styles and iconographies. Take for example a lovely Spanish Revival building in St. Louis, by the architect T.P. Barnett, son of George I. Barnett, another famous architect in St. Louis. The T.P. Barnett building is particularly interesting because it also has Art Deco influences, making it one of the most unique buildings in the Grand Center region of St. Louis. Certainly the next time youre in St. Louis, you need to visit this Spanish Revival building on Washington Avenue.